GLOMUS CAROTIDEO EBOOK

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Sep 15, We present a year-old female patient with a glomus tumor treated with positron emission tomography computed tomography planning and. Demonstration of the continuity of the lesion with the vagus nerve on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) further asserts the diagnosis of glomus vagale. Glomus carotideo complications - when the patient refuses treatment. Authors: Darlene Adolfo, Pedro Vieira, Andreia Póvoa, Cristina Published eBooks. 7 2.


Glomus Carotideo Ebook

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Glomus carotideo complications - when the patient refuses treatment. Darlene Adolfo, Pedro Vieira, Andreia Póvoa, Cristina Sequeira. International Journal of. GLOMUS CAROTIDEO EBOOK - On Sep 7, Jose Luis Camacho Velasquez (and others) published: Glomus carotideo como causa de ictus. Enquanto que o. Items - of Interaction of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (Glomus intraradices. Full Text Available RESUMENLos tumores del glomus carotídeo se caracterizan por su vascularización importante y pp. $55 (cloth/ebook.

Oropharyngolaryngoscopy revealed no medial displacement of peritonsillary structures and no vocal cord paralysis. A previous contrast-enhanced CT scan of the neck, performed in , before surgical removal of the right carotid paraganglioma, revealed lesions on both sides, at level of carotid bifurcation, with high contrast enhancement Fig.

On the left side, a well-defined hyperdense mass 6. A carotid angiography performed before excision of the right carotid paraganglioma showed, on the left side, a highly vascular mass on the outside of carotid bifurcation Fig.

On the right side, angiography showed evidence of the removed vascular lesion inside carotid bifurcation Fig. A new CT scan was not performed because swelling did not appear increased in the last months and the patient continued to be asymptomatic. The upper region of the neck was explored through an oblique incision along the anterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle extending to the preauricular region.

A vascular brownish-red mass was found between the carotid arteries antero-laterally and the internal jugular vein postero-medially not occupying the carotid bifurcation angle. The tumour, probably originating from the inferior ganglion of the vagus nerve, compressed and dislocated, but did not infiltrate the jugular vein and the hypoglossal nerve from which it was separated, without vascular or neurological lesions.

Even though the mass extended cephalad in the neck and medially to the parapharyngeal space, it was possible to approach it by means of a trans-cervical incision with digastric and stiloid tendon resection and stiloid bone rupture without other manoeuvres.

Since the tumour encapsulated Fig. Contrast-enhanced CT scan of neck showing, on left side, a mass 6. On right side: another mass Carotid angiography confirming, on left side, a highly vascular lesion displacing anteriorly internal and external carotid artery with feeders from external carotid artery.

A hypertrofied ascending pharyngeal artery a. On right side: a vascular lesion in the enlarged carotid bifurcation angle b.

No further procedures to facilitate post-operative rehabilitation of the patient were performed. Histopathology of the resected specimen was consistent with paraganglioma of vagal origin.

Revista Argentina de Anestesiología

After the operation, the patient suffered from mild paralysis of the left facial nerve, hoarseness and nasal regurgitation. Fibre-optic laryngoscopy revealed paralysis in abduction of the left vocal cord and the patient underwent deglutition and phonation rehabilitation.

At 6-month follow-up, the patient was found to have less evident signs of left facial nerve paralysis, and no longer presented aspiration, but still suffered from persistent hoarseness of the voice. Today, 8 years after surgery, the patient is well, not presenting any recurrence or metastases and, moreover, has an almost normal voice.

Case 2 A year-old female was admitted on July 5 th with a month history of painless swelling in the left upper region of the neck. Patient examination revealed a small, painless, firm, swelling 3 x 2 cm in size, in the left jugulo-digastric area.

Contrast enhanced CT scan of the neck revealed a hypervascular lesion A carotid angiography confirmed the presence of a highly vascular mass lying outside and above the carotid bifurcation Fig. Magnetic Resonance Imaging MRI was not performed for the presence of ferromagnetic artifacts due to a not removable dental prosthesis. During surgery, performed by means of a trans-cervical approach, a 3 x 2 cm highly vascular lesion was found displacing forward the internal carotid artery and backwards the jugular vein without occupying the carotid bifurcation angle.

The lesion, found to arise from the left vagus nerve, was excised together with part of the nerve involved Fig. No additional procedures to improve rehabilitation were carried out.

The histopathology of the resected specimen 3 Vagal paraganglioma within a week. Subsequent laryngoscopies demonstrated persistence of the post-operative left vocal fold paralysis.

Contrast-enhanced CT scan of neck showing left mass Digital angiography showing a tumour blush lying outside and above the carotid bifurcation a with feeders from external carotid artery particularly from a hypertrofied ascending pharyngeal artery b. Post-operative morbidity revealed hoarse voice and some difficulty in swallowing, from which the patient promptly recovered Discussion Vagal paragangliomas are unusual tumours approximately cases having been reported 1 arising from nests of paraganglionic tissue within the perineurium at various sites of the vagal nerve, but generally in the region of the jugular and nodose ganglia.

Glomus vagale tumour, can it be diagnosed only on sonography?

As opposed to carotid body tumours, vagal paragangliomas are located more cephalad in the neck, between the jugular vein and the internal carotid artery, sometimes extending to the base of the skull through the jugular foramen 5 or posteriorly to the mastoid tip 6.

Oropharyngeal involvement, due to bulging of the pharyngeal wall into the pharyngeal lumen and medial displacement of the tonsil, may occasionally be observed Vagal paragangliomas which occur more frequently in female 2.

Typically, they present with an asymptomatic neck mass behind the angle of the mandible, with no other symptoms. Vagal paragangliomas may be sporadic or familial, with an autosomal dominant pattern with variable penetrance 3.

Since there is no correspondence between histologic characteristics and clinical behaviour, malignancy is not a histological, but a clinical, diagnosis, made when local invasion or metastases are present Fig. Operative view showing vagal tumour involving vagus nerve a and removal with segment of vagus nerve involved b. High definition imaging techniques contrast computed tomography and conventional angiography reveal the tumour as an intensely vascular enhanced mass, which displaces the internal and external carotid arteries anteriorly and the internal jugular vein posteriorly Apart from vascular displacement, carotid angiography may demonstrate tumour arterial supply by feeders from the external carotid artery and particularly from the ascending pharyngeal artery However, at present, MRI is considered the most important imaging modality, especially for lesions involving the skull base This leads to release of the neurotransmitter dopamine in the glossopharyngeal glomus carotideo vagus afferente to the vasomotor area.

In the follow-up two patients died due to causes that were not related to the paraganglioma; the others remained asymptomatic. Anterior interventricular Left circumflex Left marginal.

Presentation depends on the degree of middle ear involvement. Case 11 Case Case 3 Case 3.

Paragangliomas of the head and neck: This page was glomus carotideo edited on 24 Marchat glomus carotideo The larger the tumour the higher the risk of carofideo complications 2. Carotid body — Wikipedia The feedback from the carotid body is sent to the cardiorespiratory centers in the medulla oblongata via the afferent branches of the glossopharyngeal glomus carotideo. The relative craotideo of glomus jugulare with glomus carotideo to other head and neck paraganglioma varies from publication to publication and depending on definition of the terms jugulare, tympanicum and jugulotympanicum.

Angiography also has a role to play in preoperative embolisation, which is typically carried cartoideo days prior to surgery, however care must be taken to fully evaluate feeding vessels.

Bilateral glomus tumor treated with PET-CT based conformal radiotherapy: a case report

Abstract Introduction Glomus tumors are benign, slow growing tumors originating from paraganglionic tissue, mostly located at the carotid bifurcation, jugular foramen, cervical portion vagus nerve, and middle ear cavity. Radiotherapy is treatment of choice for patients with intracranial extension, and patients with bilateral and multiple tumors, or patients who are inoperable.

Case presentation We present a year-old female patient with a glomus tumor treated with positron emission tomography computed tomography planning and 3D conformal radiotherapy, and the patient has remained free of disease progression 2 years after. Conclusion It is suggested that radiotherapy is a good treatment modality in patients with glomus tumor, and metabolic imaging and treatment planning with positron emission tomography computed tomography is superior to other imaging modalities.

Introduction Glomus tumors GT , also named as paragangliomas and chemodectomas are rare tumors, accounting for 0. These benign, slow-growing tumors originate from paraganglionic tissue, mostly located at the carotid bifurcation, jugular foramen, cervical portion vagus nerve, and middle ear cavity [ 2 , 3 ].J Appl Physiol — Neurosci Lett 6: 95— Carotid body Carotid glomus tumours glomus carotideo rare, slow-growing, hypervascularised lesions that derive from the paraganglionic cells of the neural crest and account for almost half of all paragangliomas.

Carotid body

The histopathology of the resected specimen 3 Vagal paraganglioma within a week. This leads to release of the neurotransmitter dopamine in the glossopharyngeal glomus carotideo vagus afferente to the vasomotor area.

Vagal body tumours: diagnosis and treatment.